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20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
morsi playing a pivotal role here. how is egypt calling the shots in terms of the way the palestinians are reacting? >> reporter: well, on the one hand, one needs to remember when it comes to mediating the deals between the two sides israel has always played a critical and central role. what has changed now is the dynamics between egypt and israel after the arab spring, and after the fact that hosni mubarak, who was a staunch ally of the east, is no longer in power. and now the egyptians became an entity because of the fact they are led by the muslim brotherhood, became an entity here in gaza. and that changed the dynamics and it has changed the way we have been seeing things the way they played out on the ground. the dynamics of what is transpiring that led to the cease-fire, we'll have to wait and see if it holds. that is what has changed, most certainly, egypt, given the fact it is a very young government, has at least for now proven itself. in one sense it has passed that critical test. >> arwa damon, thank you very much. welcome to you. >> thanks for having me. >> can you outline
positioned along the border with gaza. a visit to gaza by egypt's prime minister failed to stop the bombardment and pull the region from the brink of all-out war. u.s. officials blame hamas for starting this conflict. but they are also urging to be measured in its response. the defense secretary leon panetta says israel and the palestinians need to negotiate a more permanent piece -- his words, a more permanent piece in the region. our pentagon correspondent barbara starr's been watching what's going on. barbara, what is the u.s. military most concerned about right now? >> wolf, as they watch that call-up of 75,000 israeli reservists, that is the concern. is this leading to a ground war? we've talked to officials here who say the major concern israel will move in on the ground. and that will be a significant escalation that will reverberate throughout the region. so here's the calculation. how far will hamas go in continuing its rocketed mortar attacks into israel? they know that if they pull back, the israelis presumably will pullback and this dangerous escalation can be avoide
is prepared to take whatever action is necessary to defend our people. >> while egypt's prime minister visited gaza today in a show of solidarity with hamas, israel agreed to pause attacks, but we keep hearing more coming from there, richard, your thoughts. >> look, it's possible this escalates, but it's hard for me to see how anybody benefits. israel got out of gaza -- israel's a first-world country, a first-world economy. it doesn't want rockets raining down in the middle of tel aviv. it would be like rockets raining down on rockefeller center. israel's way beyond this and wants to move beyond this. also, this brings into play the israeli/egyptian treaty and jordan. everything now -- >> so the question is, why did hamas choose to start firing rockets into israel the way they did? >> i think for hamas -- >> to start this? >> i think for hamas, it's station identification. this is what hamas does. this is how it differentiates itself but hasn't been able to deliver the goods at home to the palestinian people in gaza. this galvanizes its space. it shows the hamas, quote, unquote, is doing somet
-guided missiles. in this case, striking what is said to be the home of an hamas leader. egypt is trying to prevent this war from getting out of hand. spearheading talks aimed at ending the violence. israel's prime minister says hamas can end all this. bd ben wedeman is watching the conflict play out. >> reporter: we've seen apparent urgent action by the israeli army in this area to get as much material, tanks, armoured personnel carriers and troops in the area around gaza in obvious preparation for a potential ground invasion of the gaza strip. but a decision to actually go in has to come from the leadership, from prime minister benjamin netanyahu and from his security cabinet. that has not come yet. on sunday, it's expected that the secretary general of arab league is going to come to gaza with four arab foreign ministers. it may be difficult to launch a ground invasion while just a high-level group is there. we understand that intense contacts are under way between israel and the united states to potentially talk about a cease-fire. i spoke with a senior israeli spokesman who flatly denied repor
something as to potentially save them from an islamist in egypt. >> reporter: what about china, on the break of an important party election of its own. >> how the work will be going in china. >> reporter: analysts say the reason so many europeans might be so reluctant to see an administration change in the u.s. is because they worry about what's forging that new relationship would mean to them, and politically speaking to them change doesn't necessarily have a positive connotation. in some of their own experiences lately, it's only worsened problems like with youth unemployment. savannah. >> michelle kosinski in london this morning, thank you so much. >>> just ahead, how well does christina aguilera really know her fellow coaches on "the voice." we'll put her to the test after your local news. living with moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis means living with pain. it could also mean living with joint damage. help relieve the pain and stop the damage with humira, adalimumab. for many adults with moderate to severe ra, humira is clinically proven to help relieve pain and stop joint damage.
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)

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